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LAS 2K16: celebrating undergrad research

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Some of the presenters and their presentation titles (including me!)

 

The Liberal Arts Symposium is one of the most popular traditions in the spring semester, and is where classes are cancelled and the entire college community celebrates the research, project development, and performances of Juniata students. I remember my freshman and sophomore year attending the different presentations and thinking with excitement, “I’m going to present MY thesis senior year!” Well that day came, and let me tell you, I was not feeling excitement anymore but sweaty palms and a knotted up stomach.

This entire year, I’ve been working on my senior honors thesis. As I wrote in my last blog, I’ve been looking at how the Indian media talks about corruption, and though I’m still writing my paper, I was able to share with my friends, classmates, and professors my preliminary findings. (Which is that the way we think about corruption, innocence, and guilt in the West is very different than the way Indian newspapers frame it in a specific politician corruption case.) I practiced my presentation a countless number of times, but that didn’t keep me from feeling extremely nervous before I went.

It ended up going pretty smoothly though! To be honest, I don’t remember anything about it except that I think I talked pretty quickly. Whenever I stumbled over my words or suddenly felt uncertain about what I was saying, all I had to do was look out into the audience, where I had so many friends and classmates supporting me. After it was over, I felt so proud; it was so incredibly rewarding, sharing what I’ve been doing with the Juniata community.

Other presentations were just as good! One friend presented on U.S. immigration policies, and another presentation I went to was on research looking at how to genetically modify mosquitos to halt the spread of malaria. My favorite presentation, though, was about synesthesia and the museum experience – the two presenters are even designing their own art exhibition based on their research findings! All in all, the Liberal Arts Symposium was an amazing day!

The Semester is ‘Final’ly Over

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Figure 1: Getting Ready for Madrigal

 

The end of the year at Juniata is a fun and exciting time that’s here and gone faster than you can say ‘finals’. One minute you’re picking out your Madrigal suit, the next you’re spending way too many hours awake studying for the final you’ve known about for three months but have been ignoring till two days before. The most fitting metaphor I can think of is that of a dance… and that’s not just because Madrigal was last weekend. When we got back from Thanksgiving break, the campus was abuzz with excitement about Madrigal, what dresses people were ordering, what tie was going to go with whose dress, and which professor would be serving you at the dinner. There is always a frenzy of activity the week leading up to the traditional dinner and dance because it is the last big event before the end of the year. As soon as we wake up the Sunday after the dance, we stop performing the excited happy dances of young people and start the exasperated stress induced dance of the overworked and under slept.

Finals week and the week leading up to it are not all that bad. They just sort of creep up on you. One minute you are going through RA training, the next you are living in some forgotten corner of an academic building trying to remember a semester’s worth of Inorganic chemistry in preparation for your upcoming test. Madrigal is rather well placed, because although it cuts a bit into study time before finals, it gives us one last opportunity to let loose with friends, to reminisce about the semester, and to hang out with some of the best people you will ever meet before you all go home for a month.

We go through the semester attending classes, completing homework, hanging out with friends on the weekends, procrastinating, procrastinating on the procrastinating, and before we know it another semester has come and gone, another year coming to a close. Similar to how I danced at Madrigal, I think as a school we go through the year in a very eclectic way. One minute you could be doing the hustle, the next dancing a slow waltz. One Thursday you are pulling an all-nighter to make up for your weeks of procrastination and Friday night you’re procrastinating again. And while this cycle may seem grueling at times, it really makes the time fly by.

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Figure 2: Ochem, Not even Once

 

The semester is almost over and that means the end of a lot of things. For me it’s the end of organic chemistry, a class that has reshaped how I think about science, and the first half of my sophomore year. There are those older than I that may be graduating and ending their time here at Juniata. The ending of anything brings with it a sense of melancholy. Even though I will be returning for RA training in only a few short weeks, another stage of my college career, however small, is over.

Thankfully with every ending there is a new beginning and I personally cannot wait to see what next semester has in store.

Tenting for Madrigal: the last tradition of the semester!

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Tents tents tents!

 

Sometimes in life you’ll walk past something happening, and just think to yourself “who would ever think that was a good idea?” Tenting at Juniata is one of those things.

Everyone says that Juniata is all about traditions, and you know what? They’re right. We really are. I have made it to November, meaning I have overcome the challenge of prying open a lobster with just my bare hands at Lobsterfest. I tried my best to break through the ranks of rugby players for Storming of the Arch and was thrown to the ground many times as a result. I eagerly awaited the arrival of Mountain Day, and was disappointed many, many times before it finally came. Finally, after that barrage of traditions, we have reached Tenting.

Tenting only consists of a few simple things. You have to gather a group of 6-8 people and take turns sleeping in a tent for six nights. Also, it’s in November. Oh, and they wake you up for roll calls in the middle of the night with an air horn. I almost forgot… when they wake you up in the middle of the night, you might have to compete in challenges like a game of Ninja or Four Corners. One more thing: we have different competitions every night to earn points for our tent.

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For the scavenger hunt competition, one of the required items was a photo with William J. von Liebig.

 

You might be thinking: why would you ever do that? Well, at Juniata we have a yearly dance and dinner right before Winter Break called Madrigal. At this dinner, professors serve you food, you get to dress up, and you get to sing The Twelve Days of Christmas. The purpose of tenting is to get tickets to that dinner. Groups get dibs on tables based on their ranking at the end of the six days. So obviously, it’s worth it.

I’ve never been a person to function well off of small amounts of sleep. Tenting this week is going to force me to change that. I’ve also never been a person who enjoyed freezing in my sleep, but tenting might just change that as well. I realize that I’m making this wonderful event sound awful, but that’s just the two hours of sleep talking, so don’t take it to heart. In all honesty, based off of the one night I have done it, tenting this week seems like it’s going to be a blast, and I can’t wait to see how the rest of the week goes. Plus, why start skipping out on traditions now? I’ve made it this far.

Having Fun Along With the Workload

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Looking pretty for the Homecoming dance! (Photo: Morad Chihab)

We’re finally in October, and as the Fall Break approaches, we can’t help but feel excited! Well… not so fast.

First off, this month is when the college workload finally shows you its true colors. From CWS courses wanting 4 page essays, plus reading responses, plus lap journals and mandatory freshman meetings, to history courses wanting research papers and 200 page readings per week, college just dumps everything on you at once! Oh, did I mention the commitments that you have to clubs?

I actively participate in five different clubs: Plexus, Chinese club, Japanese Club, French Club and the African club. The clubs are all very diverse and do their best to stay true to their moto. Just last week, the Chinese club not only organized the Chinese Moon festival (also known as the lunar Mid-Autumn Festival and zhōng qiū jié in Chinese) and shared moon cakes with others, but they will also organize Chinese dinners (monthly) at the Chinese village. Ok, I must admit that the Chinese club is one of my favorites because, after all, I am a food person! The Japanese club does not hesitate to invite members to cook with them, and the French club puts together movie nights (the next one is this Friday!). Speaking of French club, they organized a trip to Montreal and Quebec City during Fall Break, for which I happily signed up. My Fall Break is going to be a blast!

I had the most amazing Friday on campus thanks to the Williamsburg Salsa Orchestra. I was expecting the show to be dull and average, but the next thing I knew, everyone around me, including the lead singer and the entire orchestra, was moving with energy and dancing their souls out! You couldn’t help but move along. It felt very refreshing being in the Halbritter Auditorium that night. Thank you, Juniata Presents!

Homecoming, something that my friends (mostly Francophones like me), were looking forward to, took place last weekend! Before the actual soirée, we saw families arrive on campus to visit their students. Tears were shed, hugs were given, and students’ rooms were cleaned up. My international friends were feeling homesick. Seeing other students’ families made them miss their own families and friends back in their home country. I missed my mother as well, who was not able to come visit me that weekend even though she was about 3 hours away in Maryland. Nevertheless, I had a great time dressing up for homecoming and dancing with my friends.

As I am sitting at the library and writing this blog, regardless of the workload (4 more research articles to go through, 3 IA assignments to turn in, 2 reading and a research topic that I need to start), I enjoy being at Juniata. If you are like me and procrastinate from time to time, well, start early, take things one at the time and see where the wings take you. Remember the light at the end of the tunnel?

Mountain Day: A Retrospective

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When I was a freshman, Mountain Day was more of a myth to me than an actual event. There was a poster at Lobsterfest, letting people guess when Mountain Day was, and every now and again I would hear not-so-quiet conversation about the actual date. Plus, there was an art to the speculation. Everyone had their own telltale sign that let them know Mountain Day was tomorrow. But most of these speculators forgot the one important fact about Mountain Day: It is always tomorrow.

Of course when Mountain Day did come it was amazing! After all, it’s a day off from the rigors of academics and, for once, a day to sleep in. It provides an opportunity to rest, to have a break right before Midterms begin, and it can also be a catch up day, a time to study for the upcoming Calculus test or to work on an Organic Chemistry pre-lab. Whatever reason the students of Juniata College have for wanting or needing Mountain Day, they all let loose a collective sigh of relief, as the news of Mountain Day echoes across Campus.

For me, Mountain Day this year was meant to be a day to catch up on homework. But fate had other plans, and instead I spent most of the day catching up on sleep and friends. Looking back (a mere three days later) that is really what I needed. As classes get deeper into material and professors begin to expect more from their students as they get into the groove, we often lose track of some aspects of our lives. We forget to call home because we might have an essay due the next day that we have to finish (or start). Sometimes we even neglect our friends because we are so busy with keeping up with work that any free time that we have is dedicated to homework, a job, or sleep.

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A much needed nap

I found myself exhausted on Mountain Day from lack of sleep and from not having enough contact with my friends. They are the people who keep me from getting homesick, the people I confide in, and the ones who help me to hurdle barriers when I cannot do it on my own. Sitting under a tree at Raystown Lake, I was able to slow down and to even stop a minute and reflect on my first month as a sophomore, to be able to take just a moment to appreciate the people I have surrounded myself with here at Juniata. College is an amazing experience, and the one Juniata offers is unique in so many ways, but it does not come without its trials. Days like Mountain Day offer a respite from the rigors of everyday college life and life in general.

So my advice for next Mountain Day… just see where it takes you. In the end you might find that what you did was more worthwhile than what you had planned.

When Juniata Starts to Feel Like Home

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I was terrified to come to Juniata.

Okay, terrified might be a bit of an exaggeration, but I was scared. I had never been away from my family for more than a week and a half before, and unlike most college freshmen, I wasn’t in the business of actively trying to get away from them.

Juniata is exactly three hours from my hometown of Springfield, Virginia. It doesn’t sound like much, but it’s a really long walk if you don’t have a car. My mom wanted me to get adjusted to campus life, so “See you at family weekend!” is what my family said. Now don’t get me wrong, I love my mom and I appreciate that she did that because she was right to leave me some time to get adjusted, but family weekend was a month and a half away. That’s a staggering amount of time to stare in the face. So what did I do? I tried to keep busy, and if I hadn’t already had that in my mind as a plan, Inbound had it in mind for me.

Inbound was a great time, but my group didn’t quite stick together as I had hoped it would. Alas, I was friendless and in possession of free time – a horrible combination. This is where step two of my plan to survive a month and half without my family came in: I would have to be outgoing. So out I went. As it turns out, what everyone tells you is true. It is insanely easy to make friends in the beginning of college. Honestly, I think it would be more challenging to not make friends. Between classes, groups of friends, and clubs after Lobsterfest came around, I was certainly (and still am) very busy.

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Somewhere in all of that business, I forgot that I was supposed to be sad, homesick, or whatever I expected to be. I was busy going to the Farmer’s Market or hiking down to the river. I was preoccupied playing late night pool in Eagles Landing and listening to speakers from The Wildlife Society. In all of that shuffle, any glimpse of tears was lost.

I still miss my family in Virginia. I miss sitting on the couch with my Mom and sister, going on meandering car rides with my brother, and eating dinner together. Of course I miss that. I think everyone does. But in keeping busy, I found a family here too. We watch movies together, go on long car rides (we go to Wal-Mart, but we’ll call it long), and everyday we try to sit down to eat dinner together. I’m starting to realize that when I go home, I’ll miss my family here as much as I missed my family when I left.

My Senior Year Bucket List

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It is officially week 2 of my final year at Juniata College, and let me tell you, I’m already feeling pretty nostalgic.  I spent the entirety of last year studying abroad, first in Russia and then in India, and though it was an incredible year full of adventures and new experiences, I am so happy to be back at Juniata.  Everyone tells you about being homesick, but no one really warns you about being campus-sick.  You really do start to miss your college once you’re gone for a while, but thankfully I still have one year left!  Here, I have created a bucket list of things I will endeavor to complete during my final year here.

  • Attend every single tradition. At which other college are classes canceled on a random day and everyone picnics at a lake in the mountains?  And only at Juniata is there an event where freshmen risk bodily harm by charging at the rest of the student body, trying to fight their way past them. Juniata College has many unique and fun traditions, and I was insanely jealous every time I saw pictures of my friends participating in fun activities, such as eating lobsters at Lobsterfest and pitching tents on the lawn for Madrigal.  This year, I am not going to miss out on any of the events and activities at JC.
  • Find the secret spots. Because Juniata is located in the mountains, there are many different places to explore around campus.  One of my favorite spots is the Cliffs, only a 10-minute walk away.  The views are incredible, but another little known fact is that there is a rope swing at the bottom (how cool is that?!).  No one really knows where exactly it is, but it can’t be too hard to find.  In addition, there are great hiking trails not too far from campus, including 7 Geocaches within a mile (a Geocache is a container filled with an unknown object that you find using GPS coordinates).  I have never been Geocaching but who doesn’t love a huge treasure hunt?!  Before I graduate, I will leave no stone unturned.
  • Make lasting relationships. This may sound cheesy, but one of my goals is to make sure I leave Juniata having made enduring friendships. Juniata is a small community, and I know everyone here has my back and wants the best for my future.  I know I can rely on my professors and advisors to guide me both in my final year and after I graduate.  In addition to becoming closer to my mentors, I am also looking forward to meeting new people and getting re-involved in my favorite clubs, like Circle K and PAX-O (a Peace Studies club).  It’s my last year to really make an impact, so I hope to be as involved as I can!  Finally, I know I’m going to miss all of the friendly faces on campus, from Laura who works in Baker to President Troha.  These sorts of people make Juniata a happier, brighter place, and ultimately a college that is unique and irreplaceable.

As much as I don’t want it to, senior year is going to fly by.  No matter what I’m doing, whether I’m canoeing on Raystown Lake during Mountain Day or debating the meaning of life with a professor, I’m happy to be back home at Juniata.  I can’t wait to start checking things off my bucket list!

Presenting at Liberal Arts Symposium

This time last year, I wrote a blog post about the experience of participating in Juniata College’s Liberal Arts Symposium as an observer. Now, one year later, I can say that I’ve crossed an item off my Juniata bucket list; on April 23, I presented at Liberal Arts Symposium with some of my colleagues from the Writing Center. This LAS marks the tenth anniversary of LAS and the first LAS presentation by the Writing Center.

To be honest, I was not supposed to present at LAS. Another Writing Center tutor had to back out since he had a job interview. Since the presentation was all about how working in the Writing Center prepares student employees for the professional world, we, of course, had to make accommodations so that he would be able to go to his professional world interview. A position opened up to present with the Writing Center team, I seized the opportunity, and I am very glad that I did.

The Writing Center’s presentation was inspired by a series of focus groups that provided us with valuable feedback about our operations and how other students view our services. After we were introduced by our supervisor, Professor Carol Peters, we began our presentation that covered the various skills that Writing Center tutors acquire and that other student employees could also acquire by modeling their employment style on the Writing Center’s. We covered leadership, communication skills, teamwork, and accountability, but my section in particular was the acquisition and use of communication skills as Writing Center tutors. After our presentation concluded, we watched the other two presentations that were assigned to the room with us, which were both very informative and intriguing.

The feeling of a completed Liberal Arts Symposium presentation is well-worth the anxiety and nerves that precede it, and I am incredibly grateful for the opportunity to participate in one of Juniata’s great traditions, “The Mountain Day of the Mind.” I’m hopeful that senior year will bring another Liberal Arts Symposium presentation my way!

Be My Valentine, Juniata.

Roses are red,

violets are blue,

some people like Valentine’s Day,

but those people aren’t you.

An example of student made valentines

An example of student made valentines

As someone who calls herself “professionally single,” Valentine’s Day is not that important to me as a day for expressing my romantic love.  However, it is too popular a holiday to completely ignore, which leaves me with few ideas about how to celebrate.  Luckily, though, Juniata College provides students with options for people who want to spend the time doing fun/silly things with friends.

In the week leading up to Valentine’s Day, clubs sell Valentine’s Day-themed items in Ellis lobby as fundraisers for their clubs.  Traditionally, the Dance Ensemble sells carnations, which students purchase for friends and partners ahead of time and the dancers deliver on Valentine’s Day.   Many of the clubs sell food- chocolate covered strawberries, fudge, cupcakes- that taste way better when you don’t have to share them with anyone else.  Buying food is both delicious and productive- while you’re devouring that delicious fudge from Amigos de Guanin, your purchase is helping fund projects in the Dominican Republic.

In addition to fundraisers, clubs and groups on campus hold events the week of Valentine’s Day.  Some residence halls hold card-making parties for residents to make cards for friends and for distribution to local agencies like the Huntingdon House.  The Social Dance club often holds a dance, sometimes on Valentine’s Day, where experienced dancers and beginners can swing the night away to all their favorite tunes.

While some students enjoy celebrating Valentine’s Day swing dancing or eating chocolate-covered strawberries, others choose to spend the night with friends.  Some of the residence halls have kitchens available for use, and they’re often heavily used on Valentine’s Day weekend as groups of friends make fancy dinners and bake heart-shaped desserts.  Still other groups of friends check DVDs out from the library and host movie marathons with friends.

Whatever your stance on Valentine’s Day as a single college student, there are lots of ways to celebrate as much or as little as you’d like.  Buy yourself fudge, make cards for friends, swing dance the night away, or watch movies with friends.  Whatever you do, have a happy Valentine’s Day!

This Week at Juniata Week 13

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